Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Here is how to learn more about the catalytic combustor in your appliance.


Understanding the catalytic combustor is as important as understanding how to operate the stove.
In other words, if the stove is operated correctly, than the catalytic combustor will operate correctly as well.


 
 
 
Every catalytic stove purchased by the consumer comes with an operating manual explaining how to operate the appliance. 
It is very important that the consumer read this information before building the first fire in their new appliance.

Every FIRECAT replacement catalytic combustor sold to the consumer by Applied Ceramics includes a brochure explaining everything they should know about the combustor.

Applied Ceramics has a website with combustor information to help the consumer with any questions. 
 
Applied Ceramics also has a courteous staff of service personnel to help consumers with any catalytic combustor questions.



 
 
 

Friday, October 13, 2017

Replacement catalytic combustors fast.

If you need a replacement combustor, I strongly recommend calling the friendly sales people at Applied Ceramics Inc. 

 Applied Ceramics has the size you need and can get it to you fast.



Use the information on my home page and contact them today.




Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Make sure you are buying the correct replacement combustor at a resonable price.





Catalytic combustors are manufactured by Applied Ceramics to a stove manufacturer's specifications. 

Each combustor requires a certain cell density to allow the stove a proper flow rate of the gases.

They are designed to allow proper residence time for the smoke and gases to burn before exiting the stove.

They are also sized based on the firebox volume.

All catalytic combustors must be EPA approved to assure the consumer they not only work, but will meet EPA emission regulations.

Once again, Applied Ceramics Inc. manufactures and stocks a complete line of all catalytic combustors.

Friday, October 6, 2017

Versagrid FIRECAT catalytic combustor warranty.

 
 
 



All Versagrid FIRECAT catalytic combustor, used as a component part of a newly manufactured EPA-certified catalytic wood burning stove, are warranted in writing.

It is spelled out in the U.S. Federal Register this way:

If the affected facility is a catalytic wood heater, the warranty for the catalytic combustor shall include the replacement of the combustor and any prior replacement of the combustor without charge to the consumer for:

(1) 2 years from the date the consumer purchased the heater for any defects in workmanship or materials that prevent the combustor from functioning when installed and operated properly in the wood heater.

(2) 3 years from the date the consumer purchased the heater for thermal crumbling or disintegration of the substrate material for heaters manufactured after July 1, 1990.

All combustors sold as a component of an EPA-certified wood burning appliance must be EPA approved.

Versagrid FIRECAT catalytic combustors are approved by the U.S. EPA.

Versagrid FIRECAT catalytic combustors from Applied Ceramics Inc. carry a six year prorated Limited Lifetime Warranty.

You are given a limited lifetime warranty from Applied Ceramics which states, Applied Ceramics warrants to the consumer who purchases a Versagrid catalytic converter as a component in an E.P.A. certified solid fuel appliance, to replace at no charge to the consumer the Versagrid catalytic converter that ceases to function within three (3) years from the date of purchase by the original consumer, providing they receive a dated copy of the original bill of sale for the stove, along with the original Versagrid catalytic converter.

Applied Ceramics also offers special prorated prices on the converter for the 4th, 5th and 6th years of the stove's life if ever needed.

Don't wait call them today if you need a replacement combustor or just have a question.
 

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Why a catalytic wood burning appliance? Reason four.

Catalytic stoves burn very cleanly and efficiently at low to medium heat outputs as stated before. The thermal stress of burning particulates and volatiles, is concentrated in the catalyst, which is a durable ceramic material built to withstand normal temperatures up to 1,700 degrees.  Focusing all of the high temperatures activity in the catalytic combustor allows other stove components to stay in comfortable operating temperatures and not get over heated.

The catalyst should be replaced every 12-14,000 hours.  Let's say you burn your stove from November through April (5 months X 30 days X 24 hours/day  4 years = 14,000 hours).  If you use your stove less than 5 months a year or as intermittent or back-up heat, the replacement cycle would be proportionately longer.

The ACI FIRECAT catalytic combustor is backed with a 6 year pro-rated warranty. Read about it in my next posting.

Friday, September 29, 2017

Why a catalytic wood burning appliance? Reason three.


Catalytic wood burning stoves are clean burning.



Current EPA regulations restrict only particulate emissions. Catalytic combustors provide dramatic reductions in airborne particulates, but catalysts are also highly efficient at burning other compounds in the exhaust stream, such as carbon monoxide, methane, benzene, and volatile compounds. This thorough combustion means higher efficiency, lower emissions, and safer performance (because the exhaust is mainly CO2 and water vapor).

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Why a catalytic wood burning appliance? Reason two.

Second reason is catalytic stoves are economical.

Catalytic stoves generally have longer burn cycles, lower stack temperatures and higher heat transfer rates than non catalytic stoves, and so the heat generated stays in your home rather than going up the chimney.

What this means is, the longer burn times and high efficiency and heat transfer rates of catalytic stoves will allow you to heat your home with less wood to burn. 
 

You save money without sacrificing heat.  It's that simple.

Friday, September 22, 2017

Why a catalytic wood burning appliance? Reason one.

First reason, catalytic stoves are easier to operate than non-catalytic stoves.



A catalytic combustor begins to burn volatile materials in the exhaust stream at 500 degrees F.  Non-catalytic stoves do not begin to perform efficiently until secondary air is introduced to exhaust temperatures that are over 1000 degrees F.

This is a crucial difference for two reasons...
a. The hotter you have to get your fire before you can start operating efficiently, the more heat you send up the chimney.
b. Achieving temperatures of 1000 degrees in the firebox is not easy task for every homeowner.

Getting secondary light-off in a non-catalytic can be difficult for an experienced technician in a test lab, and is much more difficult for a homeowner using cordwood of varying moisture content and density. 

To achieve the advertised efficiency in a catalytic stove, all you have to do is close the catalytic by-pass damper when the exhaust stream approaches 500 degrees F.  This usually takes 30-35 minutes after kindling a fire, or 15-20 minutes after reloading.

The second reason will be in my next post.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Where does the warm air in your house go?


Like I mentioned in the previous posting, some air exchange is needed in your home. However, it might be wise to consider the following tips:

1.  Check your ceiling insulation.  When hot air rises much of it is lost through the ceiling and roof.  Lack of insulation in walls and floors will cause heat loss as well.

2.  Caulk around windows, doors, pipes, and other opening in your house.

3.  Weather-strip all window and door openings. 

4.  Close the damper tightly on your wood burning appliance when not in use.

5.  Close off unused rooms if you don't use a central heating system.  Don't waste the heat......
 
Instead save some money by following these tips.
 

Friday, September 15, 2017

Air exchange in your home.

Warm air is always escaping from your house, and is replaced by the cold air from outdoors.


The typical house has one to two air exchanges per hour, and more on windy/colder days. If your house needs more insulation or has a lot of air leaks, you are paying to heat the outdoors. If the air outside is smoky, soon the air inside will be too.

However, your house should not be air tight.  Some air exchange is necessary because of things like exhaust fans, dryers, water heaters, furnaces, wood fires and etc. 

In my next posting, I will offer some suggestions to minimize excess air exchange.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

It's important to understand the catalytic combustor in your wood burning appliance.

Understanding the catalytic combustor is as important as understanding how to operate the stove.
In other words, if the stove is operated correctly, than the catalytic combustor will operate correctly as well.

Every catalytic stove purchased by the consumer comes with an operating manual explaining how to operate the appliance. 
It is very important that the consumer read this information before building the first fire in their new appliance.

Every FIRECAT replacement catalytic combustor sold to the consumer by Applied Ceramics includes a brochure explaining everything they should know about the combustor.

Applied Ceramics has a website with combustor information to help the consumer with any questions. 
 
Applied Ceramics also has a courteous staff of service personnel to help consumers with any catalytic combustor questions.
 
Applied Ceramics has a four segment video posted on this blog site’s home page, which contains information about catalytic combustors.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Operating the wood burning appliance properly.

Never burn foreign matter in your stove, such as…
garbage, painted wood, large amounts of colored paper, cardboard, rubber, plastic, paneling with glue, oily products and so on.

Burning these materials will gradually reduce the efficiency of the catalyst.


“Burn only seasoned dried wood”




All catalytic combustors used in EPA certified Phase II stoves have a life expectancy of at least, 10,000 burning hours, when used according to the stove's operating manual.

It could be said, that a catalytic combustor’s life is really based on a number of things....


Operating the stove properly,
(Not burning with firebox door open or perhaps closing the by-pass to soon.)

Proper maintenance habits to both stove and combustor,
(Simple things like checking the firebox door gasket.)

Burning proper fuel in the appliance,
(This means burning seasoned dried wood only- no foreign matter that could poison the combustor.)

Using a Certified Phase II stove for home heating and not an older stove design.
Most stoves built today are designed well and protect the combustor from the firebox flames, the older pre-phase I stoves didn't.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Most effective way to operate a catalytic appliance.


The most effective way of operating a catalytic appliance is by utilizing temperature monitors. Ideally, two sensing positions will give all the information needed to tell when to engage the combustor, how well the combustor is operating, when it's time to refuel and when the combustor is no longer operational.


The upstream temperature gauge will monitor combustor inlet conditions.
The second temperature gauge should be mounted on the combustor's exhaust side, about a 1/4" off the surface and centered on the unit. This will monitor the catalytic combustion process. If only one temperature sensor is used, it should be the one that reads the exhaust temperature of the catalytic

combustor.