Monday, December 10, 2018

How to maintain catalytic burning conditions





When initially starting up a cold stove, a medium to high firing rate must be maintained for approximately 20 to 30 minutes.  This will allow the stove, the catalytic combustor and the fuel to stabilize at a proper operating temperature. Even though temperature can reach 600o f. within a few minutes after the fire has started, if the fire is turned down to soon to a low burning condition, it will result in the fire and/or the catalytic combustor going out.

At the end of a burn cycle, it’s possible that the amount of burning charcoal remaining might not provide sufficient temperature or fuel for the catalyst to stay lit.

During the refueling of a hot stove that has an internal temperature below 500o f., it is best to fire the stove up for 1o to 15 minutes to ensure sufficient temperature and proper amounts of volatile gases for the catalyst to operate well and efficiently. 

However, when refueling a hot stove that has an internal temperature above 500o f., no re-firing is necessary.


Thursday, December 6, 2018

Starting a cold catalytic wood burning stove.






As a rule of thumb, when starting a fire in a cold stove, the combustor must have 500 o F. of temperature focused on it for 20 to 30 minutes to achieve proper light-off.
The by-pass should be in the open position during this period of time.
This will allow the stove, the catalytic combustor and the fuel to stabilize at a proper operating temperature.
Even though temperature can reach 600 degrees F. within a few minutes after the fire has started, if the fire is turned down too soon to a low burning condition, it will result in the fire and/or the catalytic combustor going out.
At the end of a burn cycle, it’s possible that the amount of burning charcoal remaining might not provide sufficient temperature or fuel for the catalyst to stay lit.
During the refueling stage, if the stove’s firebox has an internal temperature below 500 o F., it is best to fire the stove up for 10 to 15 minutes.
This will provide increased temperature and proper amounts of volatile gases for the catalyst to operate efficiently.
However, when refueling a hot stove that has an internal temperature above 500 o F., no re-firing is necessary.
Refer to the manufacturer's stove operating manual for complete details.

Monday, December 3, 2018

Is it all right to 'hot fire' a catalytic stove?




Do not "hot fire" your catalytic stove with the by-pass closed.

If this is done with the by-pass damper closed, flames will be directed to the catalytic combustor and cause damage to it.
For many years retailers and installers have advised customers to build an extra hot fire to burn the creosote deposits in the flue system.
This advice is harmful to a catalytic stove and the combustor.
Why not? Because the catalyst is reducing the particulate, or creosote build-up, therefore the need to hot fire for this purpose is eliminated.

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Why is it important to select the correct replacement combustor for your stove.


Please remember this very important information....

Cell density (16 or 25 cpsi) plus the combustor dimensions are both very important to the stove’s operation. The combustor's size and cell density was designed into the stove by the stove's manufacturer for best performance.


1. Open frontal area of the combustor is designed to receive the flow rate of the gases coming from the firebox.

2. The combustor size and cell density will control the residence time needed for the gases to burn within the combustor.

Always replace the stove’s combustor, when needed, with the original OEM combustor size and cell density for best efficiency and performance of the stove.

Monday, November 26, 2018

Operating the catalytic appliance and the combustor inside.

Understanding the catalytic combustor is as important as understanding how to operate the stove.
In other words, if the stove is operated correctly, than the catalytic combustor will operate correctly as well.








Every catalytic stove purchased by the consumer comes with an operating manual explaining how to operate the appliance. 
It is very important that the consumer read this information before building the first fire in their new appliance.

Every FIRECAT replacement catalytic combustor sold to the consumer by Applied Ceramics includes a brochure explaining everything they should know about the combustor.

Applied Ceramics has a website with combustor information to help the consumer with any questions. 

Applied Ceramics also has a courteous staff of service personnel to help consumers with any catalytic combustor questions.

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Monday, November 19, 2018

Firecat combustors are made to manufacturer's specifications.


  FIRECAT COMBUSTORS



Catalytic combustors are manufactured by Applied Ceramics to a stove manufacturer's specifications. 

Each combustor requires a certain cell density to allow the stove a proper flow rate of the gases.

They are designed to allow proper residence time for the smoke and gases to burn before exiting the stove.

They are also sized based on the firebox volume.

All catalytic combustors must be EPA approved to assure the consumer they not only work, but will meet EPA emission regulations.

Once again, Applied Ceramics Inc. manufactures and stocks a complete line of all catalytic combustors.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Limited lifetime warranty









You will be given a prorated limited lifetime warranty from Applied Ceramics which states, Applied Ceramics warrants to the consumer who purchases a Firecat Versagrid catalytic converter as a component in an E.P.A. certified solid fuel appliance, to replace at no charge to the consumer the Versagrid catalytic converter that ceases to function within three (3) years from the date of purchase by the original consumer, providing we receive a dated copy of the original bill of sale for the stove, along with the original Firecat catalytic converter. Applied Ceramics also offers special prorated prices on the converter for the 4th, 5th and 6th years of the stove's life if ever needed.  They couldn't make this offer, if they had doubts about the longevity of the unit.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Combustor cleaning help



If it becomes necessary to clean the combustor, below are three recommended methods.





Normally the catalytic combustor requires little or no maintenance because it generates such high temperatures, it is basically self-cleaning. However, should the combustor become masked with soot or creosote, it is possible to burn the accumulation off by opening the bypass and building a hot fire. Once the hot fire is created, close the bypass halfway and burn for 30 to 60 minutes with the bypass left in this position.

Never use cleaning solvents to clean the combustor. It would be wise to check and clean the combustor, if necessary, before each burning season and inspect the flue system for any signs of creosote buildup.

A clean flue helps prevent chimney flue fires.

Monday, November 5, 2018

What does a healthy combustor look like?


After the first use of the catalytic combustor, it should have a light gray powdery appearance. 

The cells should be free of any creosote or fly-ash-build-up.

Note the healthy combustor on the right.            
If cleaning is necessary, use the Firecat Operator's Handbook or call the helpful service people at Applied Ceramics. 






Thursday, November 1, 2018

Flame impingement is bad...

 Direct flame contact is death to the catalyst. A catalyst burns the byproducts in the smoke. The gases such as CO, HC, and O2 ignite with each other in a chemical reaction in the presence of the catalyst (while passing through the honeycomb configuration).

Direct flame inhibits this reaction by changing the chemical make-up of the catalyst breaking down the substrate or ceramic.

Today's modern catalytic wood burning stoves are designed so that flame impingement is unlikely.  However, it is still impossible. A strong fast draft can pull the flames around the flame shield and into the catalyst. A hot fire with all the primary air controls wide open or perhaps the firebox door or ash pan door ajar are other ways the catalyst might receive flame impingement.





Monday, October 29, 2018

Cleaning the firebox door glass.

(Always check your owner’s manual first)

1. Wash with ammonia **Recommended** - Make sure fire place is cool to the touch.
Fill a spray bottle with a slightly diluted mixture of ammonia and water. The water helps keep the ammonia from evaporating on the glass and makes it easier to use. Some also recommend using some vinegar in the mixture, although this is not necessary.
Grab some paper towels and spray the glass. Start wiping the black or foggy glass clean. It will take a couple of times to get a clear window depending on how coated your glass is. If there are some unusually difficult spots let the solution sit and react.
Also take your ammonia and water soaked paper towel and dunk it in the ashes in the bottom of the stove. Using this to scour the glass as the ash will aid in the chemical cleaning of the glass. Wipe clean with a dry cloth.
 
2. Use a Commercial Cleaner- There are a variety of products on the market that can accomplish the same as ammonia. Follow directions of whatever you choose, and make sure they do not void your stoves warranty.